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Heritage

Seminar Session

Mobile laser scanning in Tibet to model a temple; creating a BIM for Canada’s Parliament Campus; Edinburgh Castle and Neolithic sites are all benefiting from today’s toolkit of 3D technologies to create spatial datasets for asset management. Yet beyond the many technologies utilised by heritage professionals today, while evolving specifications and standards remain important, surprisingly, there remains a role for the humble pencil and tape.

Session Programme:

09:30 Wed 23   Room B

Introduction

Paul Bryan, Geospatial Imaging Manager, Imaging Team, Historic England

Paul Bryan is the Geospatial Imaging Manager within the Imaging Team of Historic England. Based in York he heads up the Geospatial Imaging team which carries out metric surveys of historic objects, buildings, sites and landscapes using laser scanning, photogrammetry and multi-image based ‘Structure-from-Motion’ survey approaches. Awarded Fellowship of the RICS in 2014 Paul has extensive knowledge of image-based survey approaches and advises the sector on the heritage application of RPAS/UAV/drone platforms and Building Information Modelling (BIM). He has co-authored a number of related documents including the Historic England ‘Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage’, which sets the standard for metric surveys across the heritage sector; ‘3D Laser Scanning for Heritage’; ‘Multi-Light Imaging for Heritage Applications’ and the recently published ‘BIM for Heritage – Developing a Historic Building Information Model’.

09:40 Wed 23   Room B

Different paths to the same destination – a range of techniques to produce complete point clouds

David Andrews, Geospatial Imaging Analyst, Historic England

It has long been an axiom that a single method is rarely sufficient to produce a complete survey. Surveyors have a toolbox of techniques. Now that most measured building surveys and 3D models are derived from a point cloud it is expedient to use whatever tools are appropriate to produce a complete cloud. The accessibility of photogrammetry and drones along with hand-held laser scanning and mobile mapping systems, means it is now possible to capture data in inaccessible areas or where it would previously have been uneconomic. A number of case studies will be used to examine the advantages and potential pitfalls of using a combination of techniques but will ask the question, is the pencil and tape measure still one of the most efficient tools?

David Andrews, BSc (Hons), AssocRICS, is a member of the Historic England Geospatial Imaging Team. He has over 25 years’ experience in the application of photogrammetry, laser scanning and other types of metric survey to the historic environment. As part of a small team he undertakes targeted laser scanning, photogrammetry and rectified photography projects. He is editor and a co-author of Historic England’s standard specification for metric survey published as Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage 2nd edn. David also manages a framework agreement for the procurement of all types of metric survey services and UAV acquired photography on behalf of both Historic England and English Heritage.

10:00 Wed 23   Room B

3D laser scanning system of Budalagong temple with multiple System configurations (TBC)

Sajjad Roshandel (TBC), PhD Researcher, Fujian Key Laboratory of Sensing and Computing for Smart City

In this research, we assess the use of mobile laser scanning (MLS) over long distances in urban areas. The Budalagong palace is located in Lhasa, Tibet, on top of Marpo Ri, the “Red Hill”, rising more than 300 metres. Since reflectance of laser beams can directly influence point cloud densities , the distance between target and sensor is a critical parameter. This case study looks at how MLS was used to capture data from the palace 700 metres away, whilst negotiating buildings and trees. The combination of normal range and long range settings are used to achieve a unified 3-D model with high accuracy.

Sajjad Roshandel’s current research interests include: application of laser scanning system in Civil Engineering; Matching and registration of Pointclouds; remote sensing and GIS; water resources planning and management; water crisis management; impacts of climate variability and change; forecasting extreme hydrologic events (floods, droughts). Specialties: Hydrologicalmodeling; Field study in river Engineering; GIS, Density Current in reservoirs, water resources management; EPC (engineering, procedure, construction) Contracts in Subsidiary Irrigation and Drainage networks. He is working on multidisciplinary major which is using remote sensing Technology in Civil Engineering. His previous research was related to water sciences and currently my favorite field of research and study is using Lidar (Light detection and Ranging), (TLS) (MLS) (ALS) Point cloud processing, Civil Engineering phenomena. In particular,”Deformation measurement” as the general topic which is included of ridges, Tunnels, Landslides, etc.

10:20 Wed 23   Room B

Practical applications of digital technologies in the conservation and asset management fields by Scotland’s national heritage body

Joann Russell, Head of Estates, Historic Environment Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland (HES) pioneer practical applications for digital technologies. We are currently leading the heritage application of BIM in Scotland; developing BIM as a holistic tool to manage and access relevant inter-related datasets for project delivery and asset management. As part of a BIM strategy we are delivering pilot HES-BIM projects to determine its most appropriate use across our portfolio ranging from Edinburgh Castle to Neolithic standing stones. BIM is one of the key strands of this Asset Management System. The Properties in Care Asset Management System (PICAMS) will provide a portal to access, link and integrate a myriad of internal and external datasets that HES holds.

Joann Russell is Head of Estates at Historic Environment Scotland, responsible for the conservation and maintenance of the 336 properties in the care of Scottish Ministers. She is an Architect with a particular interest in how digital technology and geospatial data can improve strategic investment and management decisions for the historic built environment. Others areas of expertise include assessing and mitigating the impacts of Climate Change on the historic built environment, managing visitor safety in the historic built environment and working with communities to explore the challenges and opportunities presented by the built heritage.

10:40 Wed 23   Room B

The importance of specification and metadata within heritage survey

Paul Bryan, Geospatial Imaging Manager, Imaging Team, Historic England

Published in 2000 the ‘Metric Survey Specifications for English Heritage’ was the organisation’s attempt at describing the technical requirements for metric survey – the acquisition and presentation of base data undertaken in support of conservation and understanding of the historic environment. Now in its third edition, this specification is widely used by heritage professionals when specifying survey work.  However, with an ever expanding toolkit of technologies, how can such documents keep up to date and what items should the fourth edition include when published in 2019? What level of metadata should be provided with every acquired survey dataset to ensure it is fit for purpose both now and ideally in the future?

Paul Bryan is the Geospatial Imaging Manager within the Imaging Team of Historic England. Based in York he heads up the Geospatial Imaging team which carries out metric surveys of historic objects, buildings, sites and landscapes using laser scanning, photogrammetry and multi-image based ‘Structure-from-Motion’ survey approaches. Awarded Fellowship of the RICS in 2014 Paul has extensive knowledge of image-based survey approaches and advises the sector on the heritage application of RPAS/UAV/drone platforms and Building Information Modelling (BIM). He has co-authored a number of related documents including the Historic England ‘Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage’, which sets the standard for metric surveys across the heritage sector; ‘3D Laser Scanning for Heritage’; ‘Multi-Light Imaging for Heritage Applications’ and the recently published ‘BIM for Heritage – Developing a Historic Building Information Model’.

11:00 Wed 23   Room B

Heritage Seminar Summary

Paul Bryan, Geospatial Imaging Manager, Imaging Team, Historic England

Paul Bryan is the Geospatial Imaging Manager within the Imaging Team of Historic England. Based in York he heads up the Geospatial Imaging team which carries out metric surveys of historic objects, buildings, sites and landscapes using laser scanning, photogrammetry and multi-image based ‘Structure-from-Motion’ survey approaches. Awarded Fellowship of the RICS in 2014 Paul has extensive knowledge of image-based survey approaches and advises the sector on the heritage application of RPAS/UAV/drone platforms and Building Information Modelling (BIM). He has co-authored a number of related documents including the Historic England ‘Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage’, which sets the standard for metric surveys across the heritage sector; ‘3D Laser Scanning for Heritage’; ‘Multi-Light Imaging for Heritage Applications’ and the recently published ‘BIM for Heritage – Developing a Historic Building Information Model’.

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Instrumentation and Monitoring Seminar Session

09.30 Wed 23 Theatre 2

An automated total station system for the Northern Line extension

Bruno Norberto , Head of Geomatics, Geotechnical Observations

NLE is the first major extension on the London Underground network since the Jubilee Line in the 1990s. The scheme consists of two 5.2m internal diameter, 3.2km long tunnels starting at Battersea Power Station, passing through Nine Elms Station and on to two shafts at Kennington. Two sprayed concrete lining (SCL) tunnels advance the TBM tunnels to a section of the Northern Line called the Kennington Loop. The SCL tunnels connect to the existing tunnel through two step plate junctions (SPJ) with new stations at Battersea Power Station and Nine Elms.

Geotechnical and structural monitoring have been deployed.. The presentation will focus on 24/7 automatic monitoring using automatic total stations supported by manual readings from BRE sockets and barcodes used to monitor buildings.

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