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Earth Observation and Satellite Applications

Seminar Session

Data from spaceborne satellites has enormous potential to transform organisations across the public and private sectors. Already such data is helping governments capture land plots for taxation, energy suppliers to monitor their networks, ground subsidence and more. Meanwhile, new technologies like full-colour video from satellites are emerging. But key in utilising this data will be reducing overheads so users have ‘analysis ready’ data.

Session Programme:

14:00 Tue 22   Room B

Welcome & Chair

Dan Wicks, Senior Earth Observation Specialist, Satellite Applications Catapult

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Dan Wicks is a senior Earth observation specialist at the Satellite Applications Catapult, a not-for-profit research organisation focused on promoting the commercialisation and advancement of the satellite applications industry. He is responsible for leading a range of projects in support of the exploitation of data from Earth observation satellites and is experienced in developing new geo-enabled commercial applications across a range of market sectors. Dan is accountable for the Catapult’s Satellite-Enabled Cities programme which addresses opportunities for the integration of satellite technologies into cities for operational planning, monitoring and management activities. Prior to this he has undertaken roles across academia and industry, focused on the research and development of terrestrial Earth observation applications and development of emergency management services. Dan is a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

14:05 Tue 22   Room B

Using open approaches to provide ‘analysis ready’ Earth Observation data across Defra

Pascal Coulon, Senior GIS Architect, SCISYS UK Ltd

EO data has the potential to transform many policy and operational areas within Defra. However, there are significant overheads to getting ‘analysis ready’ data to end users. These barriers are restricting the wider use of EO data especially in terms of informing current and future policy areas to ensure cost effective, more efficient and customer focused service delivery. Building on two earlier proofs of concept, this project aimed to deliver an open infrastructure to provide access to ‘analysis ready’ data and to demonstrate how this can be applied to support an operational area (such as the detection of the presence of trees). The specific business objectives are to facilitate consistency, preclude duplication and minimise business costs.

Pascal Coulon is a Senior GIS Architect at SCISYS. He specialises in the design and delivery of open architectures to support spatially enabled services. Recent projects have included work for Defra on open geospatial architectures, Felling Licence Online for the Forestry Commission and a significant role on the Defra CAP DP programme. Pascal is passionate about all things open and will frequently be heard talking about open architectures and using Lego blocks to demonstrate his points! Pascal has a background spanning a number of domains include government, utilities and engineering services. He has worked across Europe on a wide variety of projects and is an alumni of the Ecole Nationale des Sciences Geographiques in Paris.

14:15 Tue 22   Room B

Monitoring urban change in Africa with the assistance of very high resolution satellite imagery

Graham Deane, International Business Development, Airbus Defence and Space

This project by Airbus Defence and Space Ltd is supported under the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme (IPP). IPP focuses on using the UK space sector’s research and innovation strengths to deliver sustainable economic or societal benefit to emerging and developing countries. The city government of Dakar, Senegal, needs to generate revenues for developing and maintaining city infrastructure and services. Using very high resolution satellite data, the land parcels and building extents (including heights) can be monitored through a combination of 3D image analysis and field data collection. This project will provide the framework for field teams to collect and maintain a database of property characteristics enabling tax calculations for the City.

Graham Deane is a forestry, remote sensing and GIS specialist with project experience in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, South and South East Asia, China and Central America since 1976. Graham has extensively used remotely sensed data for forestry and land use assessment and monitoring and has had responsibility for marketing and technical supervision of projects in the fields of agriculture, forestry, environmental monitoring, regional and local planning, land administration and highways management. Graham joined Airbus in 2004 and is currently involved in international business development with particular emphasis on the Land Administration sector. Graham is a past chairman of the British Association of Remote Sensing Companies, a trade association charged with promoting the UK’s capability in Earth Observation and remote sensing.

14:25 Tue 22   Room B

Gas pipeline monitoring – detecting the weak link: gas service lines in subsiding cities

Pieter Leezenberg, CEO, SkyGeo Earth Observation

Stedin NV manages a 23K km gas distribution network and 1.9m home connections. SkyGeo EO data provides door-by-door subsidence risk estimates ensuring that pipelines with the highest risk are identified and maintained first. SkyGeo helps Stedin remove the most risk per connection. Gas distribution pipelines on soft soil subside with the soil. This creates a hinge point where the gas service pipeline enters the home; connections are prone to breaking. The severity of subsidence directly correlates with problems in gas delivery service (confirmed by inspection in the field). Subsidence-related maintenance is part of long-term planning. Previously, subsidence effects on risk ware based on estimations from 1 soil sample per 10,000 m2. This is insufficient: ground subsidence in soft-soil is a heterogeneous process and geographically uneven dispersed. Maintenance planning required more detailed information on subsidence. Now InSAR provides a direct estimate of subsidence effects on distribution lines from door to door, across entire service area. Stedin’s asset management applied actual EO subsidence measurements as a proxy for risk in order to prioritize maintenance activities. High-res satellite-based subsidence map produces 10,000 subsidence time series per km2 area with 5 years of dynamic subsidence history of streets and buildings. The measurements were used to create a street-level deformation map, showing subsidence rates up to 3 cm per year and unpredictably distributed.

Pieter Leezenberg received his Masters from Geology VU, Amsterdam and his PhD from Stanford University. He has been in the earth observation industry since 2005. He became CEO and co-founder at SkyGeo in 2011.

14:35 Tue 22   Room B

GeoMOVE: Merge regional geological parameters with measured ground motion for the transport sector

Clare Roberts, Remote Sensing Consultant, CGG - NPA Satellite Mapping

Ground instability is present in many areas of the UK and can be due to natural geological processes such as shrink-swell clay or activities such as groundwater pumping and old mine workings. Conventional surveying techniques are capable of measuring surface movement and on-site monitoring networks can be installed in regions influenced by ground motion. However, it is not practical or cost-effective to install a large regional scale in-situ measurement network. Satellite imagery makes this possible and combined with geological information has led to the development of a unique source of regional ground stability data (1:50,000) called GeoMOVEâ„¢ (Geological Motion Observations & Velocity Evaluation), a targeting tool that identifies.

Claire Roberts is an experienced remote sensing professional at CGG who has an established track record of providing expert advice to commercially develop Earth observation (EO) products and services. Claire manages the LiveLand project. The GeoMOVEâ„¢ product has been developed in partnership with Jessica Warr and Adam Thomas at CGG and Katy Lee and Helen Reeves from the British Geological Survey. The LiveLand project has been supported by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of the ARTES 20 IAP funded development prgramme.

14:45 Tue 22   Room B

Q&A

Dan Wicks, Senior Earth Observation Specialist, Satellite Applications Catapult

14:55 Tue 22   Room B

Coffee Break

15:10 Tue 22   Room B

Video from Space – a new dimension realised

Peter Hausknecht, Chief Scientist, EARTH-i

A new dimension in Earth Observation is driven by Earth-i Ltd. They are launching the world’s first constellation of satellites to provide full-colour video capabilities, with each satellite able to provide both still imagery and video capability at 1m resolution or better. The Vivid-i constellation already has a prototype satellite in space. The subsequent constellation will provide multiple revisits throughout the day, for any location, delivering very high-resolution data. The new dimension is centred around time. Each satellite will be able to record full-colour video sequences, of up to 90 seconds over the same place, locked on the target area of interest.

Peter holds a PhD in Geoscience from Munich University and has worked for more than 25 years in the Earth Observation sector. Peter has varied experience with a multitude of sensors and data sets, both aerial and satellite. Peter began his early career at DLR and German Aerospace Centre, before specialising in with remote sensing for Fugro Airborne Surveys in Perth and subsequently for HyVista Corp. in Sydney. In 2007 Peter joined Woodside, Australia’s leading Oil & Gas company, where he stayed until 2015 as the subject matter expert on Earth Observation and remote sensing for the company. At an international level, Peter was a founding member of the OGEO (Oil & Gas Earth Observation) interest group in 2010 and later became chairman of the IOGP (Int. Association of Oil and Gas Producers) Geomatics subcommittee on Earth Observation. Peter joined Earth-i in 2015 as their Chief Scientist.

15:20 Tue 22   Room B

Building The DigitalGlobe

Luca Parletta, Sales Manager - Strategic Accounts, Digital Globe

The powerful combination of high resolution imagery, cloud based platforms and artificial intelligence has recently unlocked a number of opportunities. Today, we have the technology and expertise to build a digital inventory of our entire planet to enable an ever growing number of users to make the most timely and confident decisions. This talk explores how we got this far and the steps we are taking to build a truly Digital Globe.

Luca Perletta has a MSc in signal processing and remote sensing. In his time in DigitalGlobe, he has focused on facilitating the adoption of satellite imagery and applied artificial intelligence within the EMEAR market, providing technical expertise to clients who started to explore big data and cloud based platforms. He currently works to develop strategic accounts relationships, to grow into new sector of applications for geospatial data.

15:30 Tue 22   Room B

Changing the way we see the world with automated business intelligence

Alexis Smith , CEO & Founder, IM Geospatial

Presentation Information Coming Soon

Alexis Hannah Smith is the founder and CEO of IMGeospatial.

Alexis has enjoyed a successful career working in the business and entertainment sectors around the world.

As a passionate entrepreneur, she is now applying her skills and knowledge to the field of automated business intelligence, specialising in location technologies and driving innovation to create change for a better world.

Her business, IMGeospatial, creates automated business products which are based on machine-learning, artificial intelligence, automatic feature extraction, remote-sensing and multiscopic data providing valuable intelligence to many industry sectors around the globe.

Alexis will demonstrate how IMGeospatial technologies can create positive change for individuals, communities and societies and she has delivered case study presentations at several high profile conferences including the influential World Bank Land and Poverty conference in Washington, DC and the UK Flood and Coast conference in 2017.

Alexis is also a keen sportswoman enjoying heliskiing, marathon running and holds a Yachtmaster certification.

15:40 Tue 22   Room B

Q&A and Summary

Dan Wicks, Senior Earth Observation Specialist, Satellite Applications Catapult

Dan Wicks is a senior Earth observation specialist at the Satellite Applications Catapult, a not-for-profit research organisation focused on promoting the commercialisation and advancement of the satellite applications industry. He is responsible for leading a range of projects in support of the exploitation of data from Earth observation satellites and is experienced in developing new geo-enabled commercial applications across a range of market sectors. Dan is accountable for the Catapult’s Satellite-Enabled Cities programme which addresses opportunities for the integration of satellite technologies into cities for operational planning, monitoring and management activities. Prior to this he has undertaken roles across academia and industry, focused on the research and development of terrestrial Earth observation applications and development of emergency management services. Dan is a fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

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