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Heritage

Seminar Session

Mobile laser scanning in Tibet to model a temple; creating a BIM for Canada’s Parliament Campus; Edinburgh Castle and Neolithic sites are all benefitting from today’s toolkit of 3D technologies to create spatial datasets for asset management. Yet beyond the many technologies utilised by heritage professionals today, while evolving specifications and standards remain important, surprisingly, there remains a role for the humble pencil and tape.

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Session Programme: 09:30 - 11:10

09:30 - 09:40 Wed 23   Room B

Introduction

Paul Bryan, Geospatial Imaging Manager, Imaging Team, Historic England

Paul Bryan is the Geospatial Imaging Manager within the Imaging Team of Historic England. Based in York he heads up the Geospatial Imaging team which carries out metric surveys of historic objects, buildings, sites and landscapes using laser scanning, photogrammetry and multi-image based ‘Structure-from-Motion’ survey approaches. Awarded Fellowship of the RICS in 2014 Paul has extensive knowledge of image-based survey approaches and advises the sector on the heritage application of RPAS/UAV/drone platforms and Building Information Modelling (BIM). He has co-authored a number of related documents including the Historic England ‘Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage’, which sets the standard for metric surveys across the heritage sector; ‘3D Laser Scanning for Heritage’; ‘Multi-Light Imaging for Heritage Applications’ and the recently published ‘BIM for Heritage – Developing a Historic Building Information Model’.

09:40 - 10:00 Wed 23   Room B

Different paths to the same destination – a range of techniques to produce complete point clouds

David Andrews, Geospatial Imaging Analyst, Historic England

It has long been an axiom that a single method is rarely sufficient to produce a complete survey. Surveyors have a toolbox of techniques. Now that most measured building surveys and 3D models are derived from a point cloud it is expedient to use whatever tools are appropriate to produce a complete cloud. The accessibility of photogrammetry and drones along with hand-held laser scanning and mobile mapping systems, means it is now possible to capture data in inaccessible areas or where it would previously have been uneconomic. A number of case studies will be used to examine the advantages and potential pitfalls of using a combination of techniques but will ask the question, is the pencil and tape measure still one of the most efficient tools?

David Andrews, BSc (Hons), AssocRICS, is a member of the Historic England Geospatial Imaging Team. He has over 25 years’ experience in the application of photogrammetry, laser scanning and other types of metric survey to the historic environment. As part of a small team he undertakes targeted laser scanning, photogrammetry and rectified photography projects. He is editor and a co-author of Historic England’s standard specification for metric survey published as Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage 2nd edn. David also manages a framework agreement for the procurement of all types of metric survey services and UAV acquired photography on behalf of both Historic England and English Heritage.

10:00 - 10:20 Wed 23   Room B

A project to capture information on every building in London – using crowdsourcing and visualisation

Polly Hudson, Doctoral Researcher, Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (CASA), University College London

Colouring London (http://colouringlondon.org/) is a project that is being designed to provide information on every building to address questions such as how many buildings are there in London?, what are their characteristics?, where are they located?, how do they contribute to the city?, how adaptable are they?, how long will they last, and what are the environmental and socio-economic implications of demolition? This is being achieved through crowdsourcing and visualising information on London’s buildings and is assisted by the Ordnance Survey who are providing the building footprints required to collect the data.

 

Polly Hudson is an EPSRC funded doctoral researcher at The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis, University College London (CASA). Her research focus is demolition, and the visualisation, analysis and modelling of dynamic change in urban areas over long-time periods. She is the concept designer and content director for CASA’s  ‘Colouring London’ VGI project  http://colouringlondon.org/  and is currently working with The Leibniz Institute, Dresden, into rule-based learning for building typologies, and the automated vectorisation and classification of building footprints using historical OS maps.

 

Polly designed  the Building of Bath Museum in 1992 and founded the Building Exploratory charitable trust in 1996. She was a visiting fellowship at The Centre for the Historic Environment, University of Oxford in 2010 and curated the ‘Almost Lost’ exhibition for English Heritage (Wellington Arch) in  2013.  Public appointments (past/present) include boards/committees for English Heritage, the Department of Culture, Media and Sport, The National Lottery and the Royal Institute of British Architects.

10:20 - 10:40 Wed 23   Room B

Practical applications of digital technologies in the conservation and asset management fields by Scotland’s national heritage body

Joann Russell, Head of Estates, Historic Environment Scotland

Historic Environment Scotland (HES) pioneer practical applications for digital technologies. We are currently leading the heritage application of BIM in Scotland; developing BIM as a holistic tool to manage and access relevant inter-related datasets for project delivery and asset management. As part of a BIM strategy we are delivering pilot HES-BIM projects to determine its most appropriate use across our portfolio ranging from Edinburgh Castle to Neolithic standing stones. BIM is one of the key strands of this Asset Management System. The Properties in Care Asset Management System (PICAMS) will provide a portal to access, link and integrate a myriad of internal and external datasets that HES holds.

Joann Russell is Head of Estates at Historic Environment Scotland, responsible for the conservation and maintenance of the 336 properties in the care of Scottish Ministers. She is an Architect with a particular interest in how digital technology and geospatial data can improve strategic investment and management decisions for the historic built environment. Others areas of expertise include assessing and mitigating the impacts of Climate Change on the historic built environment, managing visitor safety in the historic built environment and working with communities to explore the challenges and opportunities presented by the built heritage.

10:40 - 11:00 Wed 23   Room B

The importance of specification and metadata within heritage survey

Paul Bryan, Geospatial Imaging Manager, Imaging Team, Historic England

Published in 2000 the ‘Metric Survey Specifications for English Heritage’ was the organisation’s attempt at describing the technical requirements for metric survey – the acquisition and presentation of base data undertaken in support of conservation and understanding of the historic environment. Now in its third edition, this specification is widely used by heritage professionals when specifying survey work.  However, with an ever expanding toolkit of technologies, how can such documents keep up to date and what items should the fourth edition include when published in 2019? What level of metadata should be provided with every acquired survey dataset to ensure it is fit for purpose both now and ideally in the future?

Paul Bryan is the Geospatial Imaging Manager within the Imaging Team of Historic England. Based in York he heads up the Geospatial Imaging team which carries out metric surveys of historic objects, buildings, sites and landscapes using laser scanning, photogrammetry and multi-image based ‘Structure-from-Motion’ survey approaches. Awarded Fellowship of the RICS in 2014 Paul has extensive knowledge of image-based survey approaches and advises the sector on the heritage application of RPAS/UAV/drone platforms and Building Information Modelling (BIM). He has co-authored a number of related documents including the Historic England ‘Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage’, which sets the standard for metric surveys across the heritage sector; ‘3D Laser Scanning for Heritage’; ‘Multi-Light Imaging for Heritage Applications’ and the recently published ‘BIM for Heritage – Developing a Historic Building Information Model’.

11:00 - 11:10 Wed 23   Room B

Heritage seminar summary

Paul Bryan, Geospatial Imaging Manager, Imaging Team, Historic England

Paul Bryan is the Geospatial Imaging Manager within the Imaging Team of Historic England. Based in York he heads up the Geospatial Imaging team which carries out metric surveys of historic objects, buildings, sites and landscapes using laser scanning, photogrammetry and multi-image based ‘Structure-from-Motion’ survey approaches. Awarded Fellowship of the RICS in 2014 Paul has extensive knowledge of image-based survey approaches and advises the sector on the heritage application of RPAS/UAV/drone platforms and Building Information Modelling (BIM). He has co-authored a number of related documents including the Historic England ‘Metric Survey Specifications for Cultural Heritage’, which sets the standard for metric surveys across the heritage sector; ‘3D Laser Scanning for Heritage’; ‘Multi-Light Imaging for Heritage Applications’ and the recently published ‘BIM for Heritage – Developing a Historic Building Information Model’.

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Instrumentation and Monitoring Seminar Session

09.30 Wed 23 Theatre 2

An automated total station system for the Northern Line extension

Bruno Norberto , Head of Geomatics, Geotechnical Observations

The NLE is the first major tube extension on the London Underground network since the Jubilee Line Extension. The scheme consists of two 5.2m internal diameter, 3.2km long tunnels starting at Battersea Power Station, passing through Nine Elms Station and onto two shafts at Kennington. Two SCL tunnels used to advance the TBM tunnels to a section of the Northern Line called the Kennington Loop, connecting to the existing tunnel through two step plate junctions (SPJ).  A network of automatic total stations (ATS) was used to monitor buildings above the SPJs 24/7, supported by manual readings from BRE sockets and barcodes.  Several logistical and technical challenges were encountered during the ATS system planning, setup and operation and were overcome without compromising the quality of the data or the client’s needs.

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